Journal December 2016

Journal  December 2016

The PCMI Journal is the official publication of the Photo Chemical Machining Institute. Its purpose is to serve the needs of the PCMI members: to keep you up-to-date on PCMI activities and to provide technical information on the industry.

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Fine Line Etching of Lead Frames

Fine Line Etching of Lead Frames

Winter 1996

Fine Line Etching of Lead Frames

Lead frame manufacture has become onc of the fastest

growing segments of the photo-chemical machining

industry teday. Much of the interconnect circuitry

and components lhat used to go on the printed circuit

board now goes directly on the chip and the chips

themselves are getting smaller.

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Fine Lines in High Yield: Dry Film Photoresist Components and T

Fine Lines in High Yield:  Dry Film Photoresist Components and T

June 2004

Fine Lines in High Yield: Dry Film Photoresist Components and Their Functions

Non-chemists involved in printed wiring board

(PWB) fabrication are often mystified by the

variety of chemistries employed in numerous

processing steps such as surface preparation,

imaging, development, stripping and plating.

This is not helped by the fact that most of the

chemical compositions are “proprietary,”

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Evaluating the Registration of Mirror-Image Photoresist Stencils

Evaluating the Registration of Mirror-Image Photoresist Stencils

Evaluating the Registration of Mirror-Image Photoresist Stencils

July 1981

For the production of photoctched metal parts, by etching

through an adherent photographic stencil, the minimum size of

hole that can be made and the control of hole size are both

limited by undercut. A valuable method of improving the

perfonnance is to coat both sides of the metal with photoresist,

and expose between a registered pair of mirror-image masks.

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Experience with Ferric Chloride Regeneration

Experience with Ferric Chloride Regeneration

Summer 1992

Experience with Ferric Chloride Regeneration

Introduction

As stated in other publications, e.g~ by David Allen (ReL I), the

need for recycling our chemicals rapidly rises as the

environmental regulations are tightened.

In the chemical milling industry, ferric chloride is an important

chemical which is used in relatively large quantities.

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Federal Right to Know Act

Federal Right to Know Act

Federal Right to Know Act

Summer 1984

Department of Labor / OSHA

Published in the Federal Register November 25,1983, Vol. 48, No.

228, Rules and Regulations

Title: “Hazard Commumcation” (29 CFR 1910.1200)

Dr. Charles Ring, BMC Industries, Inc.

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Ferric Chloride in Copper Etching

Ferric Chloride in Copper Etching

Winter 1990

Ferric Chloride in Copper Etching

The etchant of choice for the production of

intaglio and relief Images in copper has been, and

is, ferne chloride, in aqueous solution. The

metal-removal is accompl1shed by an

oxidation-reduction reaction. with little or no

evolution of heat or fumes.

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Ferric Chloride Regeneration Via Oxygen

Ferric Chloride Regeneration Via Oxygen

Summer 1997

Ferric Chloride Regeneration Via Oxygen

The printband manufacturing operation at IBM

Endicott consumed large quantities of ferric chloride

etchant. This etchant is used to selectively remove material

from stainless steel panels in the printband

manufacturing process.

Jack Lubert, IBM Corporation

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Fine Line Chemical Milling with Aqueous Dry Film

Fine Line Chemical Milling with Aqueous Dry Film

Spring 1987

Fine Line Chemical Milling with Aqueous Dry Film

During my ten years of selling dry film, whenever I was given

a new dry film to test, the first place I took it was 10 a chemical

miller. The reason for this is that this industry is much more

critical to the adhesive qualities of dry films than the Printed

Circuit Industry.

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Fine Tolerances On Thick Substrates

Fine Tolerances On Thick Substrates

Summer 1988

Fine Tolerances On Thick Substrates

The demand for ever increasing finer tolerances is well

known to the photo machinist, resulting in a constant refining of

our manufacturing techniques. For the purpose of this paper, a

fine tolerance is when a dimension is called for which is

considerably less than half the thickness of the substrate

involved, and a thick substrate is one which has an overall

thickness of the order of 0.030 to 0.080 inches.

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