Fine Tolerance Work with PCM, Laser and PEF (Photo-Electro-Formi

Fine Tolerance Work with PCM, Laser and PEF (Photo-Electro-Formi

September 2002

Fine Tolerance Work with PCM, Laser and PEF (Photo-Electro-Forming)

When discussing the term “fine tolerances” for

the manufacturing processes of PCM. Laser

cutting and PEF, the term will mean something

different for each process. In order to create fIDe

tolerances in these disciplines, the processing

must be optimised and have all ofthe advantages

ofgood equipment that is properly

characterized supplemented by well-trained

staff.

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Ergonomic$ Pay$: Return on investment with a proactive ergonomic

Ergonomic$ Pay$: Return on investment with a proactive ergonomic

June 2009

Ergonomic$ Pay$: Return on investment with a proactive ergonomic program

Are you seeing an increase in ergonomic related

injuries to your employees? Does the cost and

effort needed to implement an ergonomic program

appear to be excessive? Do the following statements

describe your ergonomics program?

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Electroforming

Electroforming

Spring 1987

Electroforming

Plating can be roughly divided into three main categories -plating

for decorative purposes, plating to resist or prevent

corrosion, and plating for functional purposes. One more,

relatively new category, however, is electroforming, in which

products are made from the plating material itself.

Yoshinori Hosoe and Yasuo Uda, Taiyo Industrial Company

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Electrolytical Regeneration Processes of Common Etchants

Electrolytical Regeneration Processes of Common Etchants

Spring 1981

Electrolytical Regeneration Processes of Common Etchants

Chemical etching has become an important part in the

production of shaped parts, printed circuit boards, and chemical

machining. A good etching agent should be inexpensive, to be

used in manifold requirements, should show a little undercutting.

and a great stability in the etching rate.

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Electrolytic Photoetching and Its Applications

Electrolytic Photoetching and Its Applications

Summer 1987

Electrolytic Photoetching and Its Applications

The technique of electrolytic photoetching involves production

of a resist stencil on a metal sheet by standard procedures

used in the photochemical (PCM) industry (1). However,

instead of spray-etching as in conventional PCM, metal

dissolution is achieved electrochemically by connecting the

metal sheet as an anode in an electrolytic cell.

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Electrolytic Photoetching of Vitrovac 6025 for the Production of

Electrolytic Photoetching of Vitrovac 6025 for the Production of

Electrolytic Photoetching of Vitrovac 6025 for the Production of Magnetic Recording Heads

Spring 1985

Work carried out in 1959 at the California Institute

of Technology yielded a novel gold-silicon alloy

with an amorphous structure’. This discovery

initiated extensive research into the production of

new metal-metalloid amorphous metal alloys of

approximate composition T80M20;

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Electrolytic Photoetching

Electrolytic Photoetching

Electrolytic Photoetching

Summer 1982

In the Eastman Kodak literature of the 1960s many references

are made to electrolytic photoetching

as an alternative process to the more conventional

methods of PCM, such as immersion and spray-etching.

The electrolytic method requires the imaged workpiece

to be connected as an anode in a cell comprising an

electrical power unit, aqueous electrolyte and inert

cathode.

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Electronically Releasing Adhesives

Electronically Releasing Adhesives

Dec 2009

Electronically Releasing Adhesives

The 600 pound I-beam is suspended above the

ground, held securely in place by a single square

inch of an epoxy adhesive. The two metal substrates

that form the bond are connected to a small

battery pack. With the lip of a switch, a low power

current is passed through the adhesive, releasing

the bond so that the beam crashes down with a

loud bang.

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Electronic Photoresists for Printed Wiring Board Application

Electronic Photoresists for Printed Wiring Board Application

Spring/Summer

1995

Electronic Photoresists for Printed Wiring Board Application

The trend toward higher density, finer line circuit

board geometries continues in Japan as elsewhere.

While 150 – 125 flm lines and spaces are state of the art

and manufactured in large quantities, the next generation

of circuit board designs will be largely based on 75 100

flm wide conductor tracks with increasing density.

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